Remembering Lew Douglas

The Bay Area Math Project and the Alameda Contra Costa County Math Educators present Lessons from Lew, a professional development session in memory of Lew Douglas,  a leading Bay Area math educator who passed away in April. Lew delighted in math and developed lessons to allow others to share in that wonder. Come celebrate his life and contributions as… Continue reading Remembering Lew Douglas

Learning from Teaching (cont.)

For the second time this summer, I taught a version of my Visual Algebra workshop, this time as part of a summer institute at the Atrium School near Boston. (Earlier in the summer, I did this at Synapse School, in Silicon Valley, and wrote about it here.) Once again, I walked away from the workshop… Continue reading Learning from Teaching (cont.)

Asilomar Notes: Tech

It is widely agreed among its attendees that the Asilomar meeting of the California Math Council is the best math teacher conference anywhere. Certainly, the setting is beautiful. Over the decades, I have attended some great talks there, and this year was no exception. I will post some notes and reactions here, starting with two tech-oriented talks I… Continue reading Asilomar Notes: Tech

April Travels, May Webinar, Summer Workshops

I'll be traveling a lot this month. Here's the plan, should you want to say hello.New York City April 5, 4:30pm: I will present Geometric Puzzles at the Museum of Math Teachers’ Circle. Geometric puzzles are accessible to solvers of all ages, but they can also challenge even the most tenacious of solvers.  Join math education author… Continue reading April Travels, May Webinar, Summer Workshops

Vocabulary

In my last post, I offered guidelines for sequencing math curriculum. The response I got on Twitter (and in one comment to the post) was quite positive. However, one point I made triggered some disagreement:Start with definitions? No! Most students find it difficult to understand a definition for something they have no experience with. It is more effective to start… Continue reading Vocabulary

Puzzles for the Classroom

In my last post, I shared some generalities about puzzle creation. Today, I will zero in on the specifics of creating puzzles for the mathematics classroom. I will do this by way of analyzing some examples. Multiple PathsA characteristic of all classrooms is that they are constituted of students whose backgrounds and talents vary widely. … Continue reading Puzzles for the Classroom

Transformational Proof

Prior to the publication of the Common Core State Standards for Math (CCSSM), transformational geometry was rarely seen in geometry courses. It certainly was missing from the one I taught. Still, I have always been interested in this topic, and it provided the backbone of my "Geometry 2" class, a post-Algebra 2 elective which I… Continue reading Transformational Proof